: Obituary

Nozomu Hoshimiya (1941 – 2017)

1941 – 25 January 2017

Dear colleagues of Biomedical Engineering,

We are sad to announce that our colleague Professor Nozomu Hosimiya passed away on 25 January 2017.

Nozomu Hoshimiya was born in Japan, 1941. He received the Ph.D. degree in electronic engineering from Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan, in 1969. From 1972 to May 1982, he was an Associate Professor in the Department of Electronic Engineering, School of Engineering, Tohoku University. From June 1982 to April 1988, he was a Professor in the Research Institute of Applied Electricity, Hokkaido University. Starting in May 1988, he was a Professor in Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University (Chair of Biomedical Electronics). He was a Vice-President of Tohoku University in 2001–2002. He was the President of Tohoku Gakuin University from 2004 to 2013. He was a chancellor of Tohoku Gakuin (educational institution) in 2007-2015.

His principal fields of interest are the following biomedical engineering fields: functional electrical stimulation (FES) as a neural prosthesis, especially its application to rehabilitation fields; self-organizing neural networks, especially on the recognition and generation of the spatio-temporal patterns; and physiological instrumentation. Dr. Hoshimiya was an Ad-Com Member of the IEEE/EMBS in 1989–1990, and was a founding Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, in 1993–1996. He was also an Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Japan Society of Medical Electronics and Biological Engineering, 1991–1995. He has been an AIMBE Fellow since 2002. He was a Vice-President of the Japan Society of Medical and Biological Engineering in 1998–1999. He was a Member of the Board of Directors of the International Society of Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) in 1999–2000, and has also been the President of Japan FES Society since 2004–2005. He has been IEEE Fellow and Life Fellow since 1994, 2008, respectively.

We deeply regrets this loss and sends sincere condolences to Prof. Hoshimiya’s family, friends and students.

 

IFMBE Administrative Council

Antonio F. C. Infantosi (1947 – 2016)

1st September 1947 – 16th March 2016

 

Dear colleagues of Biomedical Engineering,

The board of the Brazilian Society of Biomedical Engineering (SBEB) is sad to announce that our colleague Professor Antonio Fernando Catelli Infantosi passed away on 16 March 2016.

Prof. Infantosi is one of the biggest names in Biomedical Engineering in Brazil, he was one of the founders of the Biomedical Engineering Program of COPPE-UFRJ, the SBEB and journal Research on Biomedical Engineering (RBE). He was President of SBEB several times and president of the Latin American Regional Council on Biomedical Engineering (CORAL).

The board of the SBEB deeply regrets this loss and sends sincere condolences to Prof. Infantosi’s family, friends and students.

Prof. Sérgio Santos Mühlen, DSc, CCE
President of the Brazilian Society of Biomedical Engineering – SBEB

Robert Albert Brown (1952 – 2016)

15th January 1952 – 4th February 2016

 

Our friend and our colleague Prof Robert Brown sadly passed away on 4th February 2016 at the age of 64. An extraordinary human being, Robert is survived by his mother Doris Brown, his daughter Elizabeth Pelichet, his son Michael Brown and grandson Finlay Brown. His passing is a huge loss to the UCL community and the tissue engineering community in the UK, Europe and Internationally. He was as well a key figure of the IFMBE Working Group for Cell and Stem Cell Engineering.

Robert was awarded his Ph.D. in 1976 by Manchester University where, under the supervision of Dr J.B.Weiss, he successfully defended his research into “A Molecular Dissection of Rheumatoid and Normal Synovial Membranes with Special Reference to their Collagen Contents”. This started his lifelong fascination of all things collagen. He had a brief stint with industry working first as a research assistant and then as Deputy Head of R&D with Blood Products Laboratory (Elstree) between 1977-1983 before joining UCL Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, Royal National Orthopaedics Hospital, Stanmore as a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer ( 1984-1992). In 1992 on his promotion to Reader he moved his research base to Bloomsbury as Director of the Tissue Repair Unit which he setup along with the UCL Tissue Engineering Centre (TREC). In 2002 he was appointed as UCL’s first Professor of Tissue Engineering and moved his research base back to Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, Royal National Orthopaedics Hospital, Stanmore. He was a founding member of the British Tissue Engineering community and past president of the Tissue and Cell Engineering Society (TCES) UK.

His key research achievements were in understanding the control of growth, especially nano-micro struc-ture, in 3D tissue models. 2 key output innovations underpinned this: orientated fibrillar fibronectin cell scaffolds and the Culture Force Monitor (CFM) model, measuring/applying directional loads to 3D culture. He was a pioneer in developing 3D models and their use in elucidating the effect of mecha-nics. His research innovation (Plastic Compression -rapid, biomimetic fabrication process for collagen tissues) established him as an international leading scientist for biomimetic tissue engineering. His ability to collaborate across disciplines resulted in many successful research alliances with leading scientists in the UK, Europe and Internationally. He successfully supervised over 30 M.D. and Ph.D. students, over 60 M.Sc. projects and numerous post-doc researchers. Throughout his career at UCL Robert was a beloved teacher, a sought after research supervisor, collaborator and friend to many UCL colleagues across Faculties. He was also a very popular and highly regarded scientist in the Tissue Engineering community nationally and internationally.

Robert leaves behind a rich legacy of scientific innovations, motivated students with successful careers and scientifically productive collaborations across the UK, Europe and Internationally. But most importantly he leaves behind a legacy of global friendships brought together by Robert’s passion for science and human beeings. We feel honoured to have spent time with a distinguished scientist, a funny storyteller and remarkable man. Rest in peace our dear Robert.

Gerhard Artmann,
Chair IFMBE Working Group, Cell and Stem Cell Engineering,
February 11th, 2016

 

Keith Copeland (1921 – 2011)

28 August 1921 – 14 September 2011

On September 14, Keith Copeland, one of IFMBE’s most distinguished members, passed away.

Keith Copeland was born on the 28th of August 1921 in Bury St. Edmunds, UK, and received his education at Cullford School in Suffolk. After passing the examination for the civil service, he started his professional life in the Air Ministry in the Works Directorate on the maintenance of aerodromes and was then called up to the Royal Air Force for training as a radio and wireless mechanic.

In 1941 he was summoned to war and was employed at numerous radar stations in England and India, working on special radar equipment that was used for navigating aircraft. After the war he resumed his work at the Air Ministry until he was offered a position in the Biophysics Department of the University College London.

It was the year 1947 when neither hospitals nor research facilities had sufficient equipment, so Keith started working to design and develop instruments for physiological research and many of his devices, such as simulators, ended up in hospital use. Today we would call somebody doing this kind of work a Biomedical Engineer. Over the next years, Keith Copeland became acquainted with others working in the same field, some of whom even had the same background and they started to call their research Medical Electronics. Like everywhere else in the world, there was no professional biomedical engineering society in England at the time, there were only the Institution of Electrical Engineers (IEE), and the British Institution of Radio Engineers that later became part of the IEE. Therefore communication among those working in Medical Electronics was loose even within a country and there was no globally established network. It was a logical next step in the further development of the profession to establish an international framework for communication and collaboration, and in June of 1958, about 50 leading scientists in the new field, Keith Copeland among them, met in Paris to prepare the foundation of “The International Federation for Medical Electronics” and to organize the new Federation’s first conference. The meeting became known as the “First International Conference on Medical Electronics” and the participants represented 9 countries.

In 1971, during the 9th International Conference of the Federation, which had changed its name to International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering, Keith Copeland, Secretary General of the Biological Engineering Society (BES) of the UK at the time, was asked – quite unexpectedly, as he said himself – to become the Federation’s new Treasurer. Keith agreed and he kept that position for 14 years, which meant beneficial, long time continuity for the Federation and its financial matters. Keith Copeland contributed to the prosperity of the Federation by negotiating the Federation’s journal contracts with the publisher, and, after long negotiations with the British Office of Revenue, he succeeded to obtain tax-exempt status for IFMBE in 1985.